Otaku Ohana

Hoku Kon rebrands (and other convention news)

April 29th, 2015

It may not have seemed like it's been busy around Otaku Ohana Central, what with my general radio silence here for a little over two weeks now, but the truth is that there's a lot of stuff going on. I've just been too busy dealing with a good number of outside-of-work things that have left me too exhausted to do much of anything else. (Nothing too weighty, mind. Unless you consider tag-team partner in fandom Wilma J. and I trading Tsum Tsum hearts back and forth a problem.)

CCH logoOne of the things I did during this recent hiatus, though, actually had something to do with this blog: On Friday, I had a chance to sit down and chat with Faisal Ahmed, co-chairman of Kawaii Kon and Hoku Kon with Marlon Stodghill, about a number of things related to the two conventions. I'll have more of that conversation posted ... umm ... eventually (the resolution of that outside-of-work stuff is still very much up in the air), but the biggest thing to emerge from it came at the very end. In a move confirmed on Hoku Kon's Facebook page last night, the convention has rebranded itself and is now going by the name Comic Con Honolulu.

There's been a fair amount of discussion following the announcement, much of it centered around possible confusion between this event (happening July 24-26; key guest so far is actress Kelly Hu) and Amazing Hawaii Comic Con (Sept. 18-20; key guest so far is Stan Lee). Here's what Faisal said about the name change and why they decided to go this route:

People just don't know what Hoku Kon is, and they're just like, "Is there any way you can add in the words 'comic con?'" It's just one of those things of getting the word out there and getting the people to understand what the show is about. Like, "comic con," people think of San Diego Comic Con. And as somebody who actually studies trademark law, I think they have a very strong right to the word "comic con," but unfortunately they don't. People basically know what it means. It's become a generic term that everyone goes, "Oh, you're gonna have comics, sci-fi, fantasy, you're going to have this giant thing, people dress up." Everyone knows instantly what it is. And a lot of the radio stations and TV stations I talked to are just like, "If you're able to add the word 'comic con' into your name, I can actually get coverage for it, I can let people know that it's happening, we can actually make it a bigger deal."

Which then ... with dealing with sci-fi guests, is what they care about. Even if you're willing to pay a lot of sci-fi guests, they're not willing to come out unless the show has 7,000 people, 10,000 people, 20,000 people. Because it's just not worth it to them. And ultimately ... my dream for Hoku Kon or Comic Con Honolulu would be to have studios come out, to have Marvel come out and have a presence, have HBO, have Cartoon Network, have all these people come out and basically give people the opportunity to have this interactive experience without having to spend the $10,000 to actually go  to San Diego Comic-Con or go to another show on the mainland, or buy a ticket that's $300.

The goal is to keep prices low. I'm sure as time goes on they'll inch up slightly, just as everything in the world does. I really don't want it to be a show where we have to charge $250 for the opportunity to even show up and then pay more money to do stuff. Everyone I talked to who isn't a nerd basically is just like, "You need to add the word 'comic con' in there and we'll understand."

This is actually the first time we're actually talking about it or announcing it. We're working on kind of finalizing how it's gonna happen, just because rebranding is always an arduous task. So we're going to start having it called Comic Con Honolulu, just so people (a) know where it is and (b) know what it is. We'll keep the name Hoku Kon as a byline, just because … we have to remember that "hoku" means "star" in Hawaiian, it is a local show. It's gonna be run by locals, the events are gonna be done all by locals, and again the only mainlanders to do anything are Marlon and I, and our job is support, is to make sure that we can provide all the tools necessary for the show to happen.

... We have to get people kind of used to the name, and used to understanding that Hoku Kon is the exact same thing, it's run by the same people. It's just going under this new name to make sure people know what the event is. And the reason we didn't call it "Hawaii Comic Con" or "Comic Con Hawaii" was just because there's already HawaiiCon, there's Amazing Hawaii Comic Con. And we wanted to show that we're doing something, again, more local. And so that's why we picked the city.

Three-day passes for Comic Con Honolulu ($45) are now available; applications are also being accepted for Artist Alley tables. For more information, visit www.comicconhonolulu.com. (Or you could plug in hokukon.com for old time's sake; both addresses will get you to the same destination.)

Meanwhile, at the other conventions:

  • Amazing Hawaii Comic Con is sending down several staff members for an informal meet-and-greet starting at 7:30 p.m. today at Dave & Busters (1030 Auahi St., in the Ward Entertainment Complex). Come down and chat with them; they'll even buy you your first drink.
  • Anime Matsuri Hawaii's Artist Alley table registrations are now live; cost is $170 (plus a $5.24 Eventbrite processing fee) and includes a 6-by-2-foot table, one three-day pass and limited electrical power. Read up on all the rules and sign up at ow.ly/MiE7s. The convention also recently announced its first anime industry guest: Maile Flanagan, the English voice of Naruto Uzumaki (who now follows me on Twitter, *squee*). Three-day passes are $45 through June 15; visit ow.ly/MiGCt to get that set up.
  • Anime Ohana still has their three-day pass for $25, but you'll have to act fast; that special ends tomorrow. Visit animeohana.ticketbud.com/anime-ohana.
  • And for those of you who really want to plan ahead, Kawaii Kon has opened online preregistration for 2016 -- three-day passes are $45 general, $40 ages 5-12. Get started at ow.ly/MiJds.

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