Archive for October, 2016

Post #238

By
October 6th, 2016



Amazing Hawaii Comic Con is hosting its Special Edition this weekend at the Hawai'i Convention Center. It's a pretty impressive guest list, headlined by comic writer Brian Michael Bendis and featuring Chad Hardin (artist, Harley Quinn), Veronica Taylor (the original voice of Ash in Pokemon), members of the Hawaiian Comic Book Alliance and Max Mittelman, Ray Chase and Robbie Daymond (voice actors who play prominent roles in One-Punch Man and Final Fantasy XV). For tickets and information, visit amazinghawaiicomiccon.com.

But you'll have to excuse me if I only briefly touch on that because of a bigger announcement that needs to be made: What you're reading is the 238th post written by either me or tag-team partner in fandom Wilma Win since Otaku Ohana migrated from starbulletin.com to the staradvertiserblogs.com domain in 2012.

It is also the final post of Otaku Ohana as you've known it for its 7-year existence.

Sunset over Ala Moana Center as seen from the Ala Moana Hotel, March 26, 2015. Photo by Jason S. Yadao.

A sunset as seen from the Ala Moana Hotel, March 26, 2015. Photo by Jason S. Yadao.

Let me clarify at the outset that I'm not one of the 15 recently laid-off newsroom employees at the paper. (Neither is Wilma.) My primary duties at the paper are as a copy editor and page designer, and I'll still be doing that. Recent cuts have, however, resulted in a shifting of priorities for staradvertiser.com, and those of us who write blogs were told earlier this week that most of the blogs -- save for the four UH sports blogs hosted at hawaiiwarriorworld.com -- would be discontinued, effective Friday, Oct. 7.

I do, however, have some good news about the future of Otaku Ohana. Shortly after that blog migration I noted earlier, I quietly reserved a space on WordPress, intending to use it as a backup in case anything ever happened to either that server or the original Star-Bulletin blog server. Things happen all the time that cause chunks of the Internet's history to disappear forever, and I wanted to be ready for that.

Thanks to staradvertiser.com webmaster Adam Sparks and Editor Frank Bridgewater, who gave me the go-ahead to do so, I'm pleased to announce that I've gained full rights to house all past Otaku Ohana content and publish all future posts to that WordPress space. So yes, this blog will live on. It'll just be updated at its new home -- set your browsers and bookmarks to otakuohana.com, please -- and be a 100 percent more freelance-ish endeavor.

So why am I continuing this blog away from the umbrella of Star-Advertiser branding? It's because it's become something more than A Thing I do in my spare time at the paper. It's become a labor of love. A coworker once told me that he enjoys reading what I write because my style seems more like it's written from a fan's perspective rather than a clinical journalist's perspective, and it's something I've tried to keep intact all these years.

In the 11 years I've written Cel Shaded and Otaku Ohana, I've met so many cool people had so many wonderful experiences and had fun writing about it all. And it's all thanks to you, the people who've stuck with me and Wilma over those years. We are otaku, fans of anime, manga, comics, cartooning, sci-fi, fantasy, what have you. We are ohana, a family. Granted, we can be a somewhat dysfunctional family at times -- trust me, I've heard enough off-the-record, behind-the-scenes stories to write a book if I was that sort of person, which I'm not -- but still a family nonetheless.

I just have one request: If you like the blog, now more than ever, please spread the word about it. I usually note when new posts go up on my Twitter (twitter.com/jsyadao) and Facebook (facebook.com/jsyadao) accounts. Sometimes Google+, too, if the Otaku Ohana Anonymous Director of Forced Social Interaction reminds me about it. Readership going forward is something I'm going to closely monitor to determine whether I should continue to request press credentials at most of the Con-athon shows, because I feel somewhat guilty asking if hardly anyone's reading.

See you at otakuohana.com, space cowboys.

Summit of the manga mega-minds

By
October 5th, 2016



This edition of Otaku Ohana is brought to you by two pens, an apple and a pineapple.

Because if I have to write this post about all the otaku activities going on at the Honolulu Museum of Art this month while I'm thinking about how there's an pen, and there's an apple, and UNH, now there's an APPLE PEN, then I'm sure as heck going to have you, dear reader, stuck with that thought, too.

(It could've been worse. The Otaku Ohana Anonymous Director of Forced Social Interaction left me with the earworm of Pentatonix's "Perfume Medley" during all of HawaiiCon a few weeks ago. You try walking anywhere having "Spending all, spending, spending all my time / Loving you, loving you foreeeever" lodged in your, lodged in your brain foreeeever.)

Even the exhibit entrance sign looks pretty. Photo by Jason S. Yadao.

Even the exhibit entrance sign looks pretty. Photo by Jason S. Yadao.

But I digress. There's a lot going on at the art museum, and much of it is tied in with a major manga exhibit: "Visions of Gothic Angels: Japanese Manga by Takaya Miou." The exhibit, ongoing through Jan. 15, is curated by Stephen Salel, the man who also assembled "Modern Love: 20th-Century Japanese Erotic Art," the 2014-15 exhibit that brought manga artists Erica Sakurazawa and Moyoco Anno to Honolulu. From the exhibit description:

Takaya’s artwork explores themes of femininity and female identity through fantastic imagery originating from a wide variety of artistic traditions: Italian Renaissance portraits of Christian martyrs, the intricate Art Nouveau style of British illustrator Aubrey Beardsley (1872–1898), the surreal puppets of German sculptor Hans Bellmer (1902–1975), and the whimsical street fashion of Harajuku district in Tokyo.

In addition to an overview of the artist’s 25-year career, Visions of Gothic Angels: Japanese Manga by Takaya Miou focuses upon two anthologies, The Madness of Heaven (Tengoku kyō, 2001) and Map of Sacred Pain (Seishō-zu, 2001). Illustrations and short stories from these publications will be presented in a variety of formats: original drawings, printed books (tankobon), large-scale wall graphics, and digital works that visitors can read from cover to cover on iPads installed in the gallery.

Here are a few shots I took at the opening night reception in August that give you an impression of how it all looks.

Here's the entrance to the exhibit. On the near wall, you can see some of Takaya's art; the far wall contains several of her manga pages. Photo by Jason S. Yadao.

Here's the entrance to the exhibit. On the near wall, you can see some of Takaya's art; the far wall contains several of her manga pages. Photo by Jason S. Yadao.

An entire wall is devoted to displaying doujinshi Takaya has published over the years. Photo by Jason S. Yadao.

An entire wall is devoted to displaying doujinshi Takaya has published over the years. Photo by Jason S. Yadao.

"After a Poem by Tsukamoto Kunio" (1998) is one of Takaya's works on display. Photo by Jason S. Yadao.

"After a Poem by Tsukamoto Kunio" (1998) is one of Takaya's works on display. Photo by Jason S. Yadao.

While Takaya won't be appearing at the museum during the exhibit's run -- I understand she's quite reclusive -- there are those aforementioned events that the museum's hosting. I was too busy to mention anything about last Saturday's screening of Miss Hokusai, but here are some pictures an attendee, who wished to be identified as "fuzZz 😸," passed along to me.

Artists hard at work at a reception held before the screening of "Miss Hokusai" Oct. 1. From left are Jon Murakami (with FIGHTING SPIRIT HEADBAND~!), Michael Cannon, Kaci Horimoto and Tara Tamayori.

Artists hard at work at a reception held before the screening of "Miss Hokusai" Oct. 1. From left are Jon Murakami (with FIGHTING SPIRIT HEADBAND~!), Michael Cannon, Kaci Horimoto and Tara Tamayori.

A fan drawn by Kaci Horimoto. It sold at silent auction for $50. (A certain blogger dork may have bid on it via proxy and won it.)

A fan drawn by Kaci Horimoto. It sold at silent auction for $50. (A certain blogger dork may have bid on it via proxy and won it.)

One of the fans drawn by Michael Cannon.

One of the fans drawn by Michael Cannon.

From 4 to 5:30 p.m. Friday at the Doris Duke Theatre, there's going to be a roundtable discussion, "Manga in Japan, Hawai‘i, and Throughout the World," featuring artists Brady Evans, Audra Furuichi and Jamie Lynn Lano; Kawaii Kon senior administrator Roy "Buma" Bann, and some friendly neighborhood anime/manga/comic blogger dork who may be revealing some big news about the future of Otaku Ohana during his portion of the discussion. (It's pretty exciting!) Come get a quick primer on the industry, learn about where we draw our inspirations from, and hear why 60% of the panel adores homespun slice-of-life comedies.

Another lecture at 4 p.m. Oct. 28 will feature Bento Box artist, former manga.about.com curator and all-around U.S. manga community sempai Deb Aoki. In her talk, "Making a Living in Manga: Bento Box and Beyond," she'll discuss her artistic career, how she got interested in manga and the struggles of contemporary manga creators. Both her talk and our panel discussion are free. so swing by, enrich your manga fandom a bit and avoid a good chunk of what's bound to be horrible afternoon rush-hour traffic.

Last but certainly not least, there's the ongoing Japanese Cinema spotlight, which I've talked about in this space before (along with several other movies that are coming up in the next few weeks!). As a reminder, here are the remaining anime on the schedule, featuring a tribute to late director Satoshi Kon:

>> Tekkonkinkreet, 1 and 7:30 p.m. today

>> Millennium Actress, 1 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 23, and 1 and 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 27

>> Paprika, 7: 30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 23, and 1 and 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 25

>> Tokyo Godfathers, 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 23, and 1 and 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 26

Tickets are $10 general admission, $8 museum members.

The art museum and theater are located at 900 S. Beretania St.; admission to the museum is $10, with free admission every first Wednesday and third Sunday of every month. For more information, visit honolulumuseum.org.

Anime Ohana postpones upcoming convention

By
October 3rd, 2016



Anime Ohana logo

It looks like the finish line of Con-athon 2016 is coming up sooner than anyone expected.

Anime Ohana, the show co-founded by former Kawaii Kon director Stan Dahlin and former Sentai Filmworks producer/director David Williams, announced this morning that it would be delaying this year's show, scheduled for Nov. 4-6, by 11 months. The new dates are Oct. 6-8, 2017, to be exact. The venue, the Pagoda Hotel, will remain the same, as will the guests announced to date -- voice actors Christina Marie Kelly, Molly Searcy and David Wald, all involved with Akame ga Kill.

From the official statement:

"In order to bring you the best possible event, we feel we need to build more awareness. We are now working with a new marketing and promotions group to help get the word out about Anime Ohana and want to give them time to properly promote the event. ... We know that this could affect some fans ability to attend the event and we will be contacting everyone who have already purchased tickets with the option of obtaining a refund if you like or applying it to the new dates."

This means that if you want to get your con fun time on, this weekend's Special Edition of Amazing Hawaii Comic Con will be your last chance to do so on Oahu this year. It's not the end of the otaku calendar by any means, though; there are several smaller events planned in coming weeks, including Kawaii Kon's Anime Day at Shirokiya Japan Village Walk Oct. 15, Neet at the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii Oct. 21, and Maui Comic Con Nov. 5-6.

Anime Ohana's withdrawal from 2016 marks the second show to do so after Anime Matsuri Hawaii's announcement earlier this year. Unlike Anime Matsuri, though, there's at least some expectation that there will be a 2017 show. Anime Ohana was the smallest convention in the state by a wide margin last year -- we're talking three-digit attendance over the weekend run, whereas everyone else recorded at least four -- and not many people I've talked to recently were aware there was a convention after Amazing this year, despite the show's increased promotional efforts.

Here's hoping the extra time makes 2017 a better experience for everyone involved.

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