Archive for the ‘games’ Category

The Zelda symphony: "Goddesses" among mortals

February 1st, 2015
By



zelda cosplayHi everyone, Jason here. Tag-team partner in fandom Wilma J. and I both attended "Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses" at the Blaisdell Concert Hall Friday night, and we each had our own takeaways from the show. Most of the music commentary will be handled by Wilma, while the extracurriculars will be handled by me (written in chunks of italic type).

Video game fans in Hawaii, particularly fans of the Legend of Zelda series, were treated Friday night to the Symphony of the Goddesses -- the first large-scale, multimedia game concert held in the isles. Joining forces with Jason Michael Paul Productions, who has produced other video game concerts in the U.S. such as "Dear Friends: Music from Final Fantasy" and its subsequent "More Friends" concert, were the Hawaii Symphony Orchestra and the Oahu Choral Society.

Cosplaying was encouraged at the concert, and quite a few people took advantage of that, although it was mostly different versions of the game series's main characters, Link and Zelda. There was also a Groose from Skyward Sword running around, as well as a Ravio from A Link Between Worlds, among the few exceptions. Navi the fairy from the Ocarina of Time also made an appearance, holding a speech bubble with her well-known phrase, "Hey! Listen!"

Photo courtesy of Chris Kwock.

Several people wore the title mask from the game Majora's Mask. Many others simply wore Zelda-related shirts -- dozens roamed around with tops emblazoned with the game's logo, the all-important Triforce, the equally important heart meter, the iconic 8-bit sword from the original game for the Nintendo Entertainment System, and much more. It was great to see such a wide array on display.

For me, that diversity came in stark contrast to the official merchandise table -- one T-shirt design, an official concert poster, a book of Zelda series sheet music and copies of the Hyrule Historia art book and Link Between Worlds for the Nintendo 3DS were all that were being offered. All of those seemed to be selling well -- heck, the books sold out -- but still, c'mon, people, we want to throw MORE money at you. Give us some CDs or a nice glossy program or something. Please?

Before the concert began, a slideshow was projected on a large screen above the orchestra, showing trivia questions on the various Zelda games interspersed with various scenic shots. There weren't many questions; the entire thing scrolled by in about five minutes or so before repeating. We took our seats about 10 minutes before the concert was scheduled to begin and saw the trivia go through maybe 1.5 cycles.

This shot was taken before the performance started, by the way.

When the lights dimmed and conductor Amy Andersson took her place in front of the orchestra, someone -- I don't know if this was official or not, but my guess is not, considering the surprised reactions on some of the symphony members' faces -- started off the evening by yelling out the phrase that has become a hallmark and one of the running jokes of the series: "Hey! Listen!"

I don't think it was, either. Which brings me to my "I guess I'm one of those crotchety old people now, because I'm about to go off on young people these days" rant: There were quite a few people who treated the show like one of the side events of an anime convention rather than something with the gravitas of a symphony orchestra concert.

Now, granted, I've seen this sort of thing happen before -- Wilma and I attended the "Dear Friendsconcert in Los Angeles in 2004 -- so I was willing to concede that, yes, not everyone's going to dress up in their nicest attire. A good chunk of the audience probably hasn't seen the symphony perform since elementary school field trip days. But still, that comment, the random CHEE-HOOOOOOting here and there, the whispered snark by the people in balcony row L, around the high 20-low 30s seats -- yes, I'm specifically calling you guys out, particularly the guy who was whispering something about Harvest Moon at the beginning of the "Great Fairy's Fountain" intermezzo -- ugh. Just because you paid $48 and up doesn't give you the right to turn it into a personal Mystery Science Theater 3000-esque snarkfest and dampen the experience for those around you who came to listen to and appreciate the music.

And don't even get me started on some of the people I noticed in front of me secretly recording parts of the concert on their phones ...

(I must say that thankfully, the concertgoers in my area quietly enjoyed the show, clapping and hooting only when appropriate.)

The symphony began with an overture encompassing a medley of tunes from the Zelda series, choreographed to video shown on the screen that was made up of gameplay clips starting with the beloved original Legend of Zelda for the Nintendo Entertainment System and going all the way through to A Link Between Worlds for the Nintendo 3DS.

Afterward, Remy Zane, a DJ with KORL 97.1 (and who, incidentally, is also one of our friends!), came out onstage to welcome the audience and give a short explanation of what we would be hearing. There were audible laughs and groans at the mention of Tingle (another inside joke; if you play Ocarina of Time you'll understand). Remy came out on stage at various points during the concert to briefly introduce the pieces.

The first interlude was a rendition of the Gerudo Valley theme from Ocarina of Time. That theme is one of my favorite songs in the entire series, and this version gave much more energy to the original Spanish-inspired, softly passionate tune, especially when the camera trained on first violinist and symphony concertmaster Ignace Jang, who played with such intensity that you couldn't help but get fired up. (A roving camera occasionally broadcast stage happenings on the screen, including various orchestra members, the chorus, the conductor, and Remy's short spiels.)

In contrast, the next interlude -- a medley of various boss battle themes -- was mediocre. Boss themes are usually heart-pounding pieces of music, and with good reason, but the arrangement of these tunes was uninspired and didn't really match the excitement of the onscreen video.

Throughout the concert, stage lighting added another level of emotion to the music and videos, more subtle than not, except when the lighting turned a fiery red to match, for example, the lava-based stage of the giant dinosaur boss King Dodongo from Ocarina of Time. Another more-subtle-than-not addition was the Oahu Choral Society. I've watched two video game concerts now and I've always felt a little sorry for the choral performers. Their singing was complementary rather than in the forefront, and I'm sure it was always meant to be that way. The chorus was also pretty hidden all the way back in the stage (people in the back rows probably had a better view of the chorus; we were sitting much nearer to the stage and could just barely see the tops of their heads), and if the camera hadn't shown them on screen from time to time, you probably would not have realized that they were adding their voices to the instruments. I would love to know what exactly they WERE singing, as none of the Zelda music has lyrics.

I was up in the balcony, and yes, I could see the chorus. There were some points when their involvement was a bit more subtle than others, and the only way I could tell they were singing then was when I could see them raising their songbooks and turning the pages. It was a nice addition, although I've often wondered what they think whenever they're called upon to sing selections from various video game soundtracks: "'Something something something something SEPHIROTH?' What did I get myself INTO here?"

The next two interludes were pretty straightforward though still eminently enjoyable suites of music from Majora's Mask and A Link Between Worlds. Then came a Prelude, telling the story of the creation of the land of Hyrule, which involves the three goddesses -- Din, Nayru and Farore -- alluded to in the concert's title. The video for this segment was taken directly from the Ocarina of Time and I assume that the Prelude was simply an orchestration of the accompanying music in the game (it's been a long time since I played the game and I can't remember how the music went). Then came a couple of movements with tunes from Ocarina of Time and Wind Waker. Again, it was all very much straightforward, nothing outstanding, but solidly performed.

I would, however, take issue with Remy's comment about Wind Waker, in which he said that it is one of Nintendo's biggest hits in the series. I may be in a minority here, but I did not enjoy Wind Waker very much, and I thought I remember reading that it didn't do too well. The art style was completely different from anything in the series up till that point, and while that did give me pause, the main thing I disliked about the game was the near-endless sailing you had to do to travel to other places. The long, monotonous expanses of water broke up the action and bored me half to death. Even when you later unlocked warp portals, they often weren't close enough to the area you really wanted to go to, forcing you to do yet more sailing. Exploring was also tedious, and the controls of the ship were sometimes difficult to handle. But, well, hey; if it was a commercial success for Nintendo (enough that they decided to do an HD remake for the Wii U, even), then power to them, but all I know is that it's not a game I'd rate very highly among the series.

For my part, I thought Wind Waker was OK. Better than Twilight Princess, for sure, which lost me on that cursed mandatory fishing minigame (Wii version) and Link's transformation into a wolf, which seemingly lasted foreeeeeeeever and bored me to a point where I didn't feel like waiting for him to be transformed back into a human (Gamecube version). And for the record, the Otaku Ohana Anonymous Director of Forced Social Interaction now likes Toon Link more than Standard Canon Link because "he looks cute." So there's that.

Photo courtesy of Chris Kwock.

Photo courtesy of Chris Kwock.

After a 15-minute intermission, we returned to an intermezzo of the soothing Great Fairy Fountain theme (minus the rather frightening, echoing cackles of the Great Fairy herself, thankfully) before moving on to a suite from Twilight Princess.

But as much as the video game world has gone forward in terms of graphics and sound, the theme of the night, really, was nostalgia. And the last movement -- "Time of Falling Rain" from A Link to the Past -- before the Finale showed this well. As Remy mentioned during one of his times onstage, "Falling Rain" is one of the most popular pieces from the series overall and the performance garnered a lot of applause. Heck, Link to the Past and its semi-sequel A Link Between Worlds are two of the series' most beloved titles.

"Falling Rain," like the rest of the performance, was accompanied by scenes from the game. But because this was a Super Nintendo game, that meant going back to the two-dimensional, sprite-based world of Hyrule. As Link to the Past is one of my favorite games in the series, I didn't mind -- and in fact I got a HUGE nostalgic kick out of it all, especially when the orchestra moved into the Dark World theme, a subtly menacing bit of music that gained some lightheartedness in this arrangement.

The orchestra, chorus, conductor and producer Jason Michael Paul -- who came out on stage after the Finale -- got standing ovations, naturally. And just as naturally, there was more to come after the Finale. First came new music and exclusive clips from Majora's Mask 3D, a remake of the original Nintendo 64 game that's due out in North America in mid-Februrary for the Nintendo 3DS. And lastly came a brief medley of Wind Waker music and scenes from its rerelease on the Wii U.

Photo courtesy of Chris Kwock.

The concert overall was what I expected. My main big disappointment is that the original Zelda overworld theme didn't get the singular performance that I felt it should have been given. It's hands-down the most recognizable piece in the whole series, and while it was woven into other movements, I feel it should have gotten its own standalone orchestration.

Now, the main theme may very well have been covered in other seasons -- apparently, the Symphony of the Goddesses has had different "seasons" with playlist changes; the one we heard at the Blaisdell was the "Master Quest season." But if it has, then I wish it would be included as a staple bonus in all later seasons. I was waiting on pins and needles for that song, and it sadly never came.

Another disappointment is that more Zelda games from the handheld consoles weren't represented. For example, Link's Awakening, originally for the Game Boy, was an excellent addition to the series with a great storyline, interesting new gameplay elements and an exquisitely beautiful theme in "The Ballad of the Wind Fish," and I would have loved to hear that song orchestrated. Granted, famed Zelda series composer Koji Kondo was not the composer for most of the handheld games and so I'm sure there were licensing or other rights issues, but there are still good pieces of music and if it were possible to incorporate more, I'd love to hear them.

My disappointments? I was kinda hoping there was some way of inserting the "You found a secret!" chime or the "Hooray! You found a 5-rupee piece in this out-of-the-way treasure chest!" fanfare somewhere in the show -- they're musical interludes of a few seconds, of course, but it would've been a neat little Easter egg and a nod to the fans. As for longer pieces, the overworld theme from Spirit Tracks comes to mind, mostly because that thing got wedged in my brain during my play-through several years back and refuses to let go. Please send help.

Also a letdown was the fact that there were no printed programs. While I, like Jason mentioned above, would have immediately bought a commemorative glossy book, I was more disappointed that there was no regular concert program. Yes, most of the people attending were most likely fans of the series and already knew the games quite well, but many others weren't, and a program giving a brief history of the series would've been nice. And Zelda-related stuff aside, EVERYONE would have benefited from having information on the producer, original composers, music arrangers, the conductor, the symphony orchestra, the chorus, the video editor, lighting director, stage staff, etc. The program is also often where production people often give thoughts or other behind-the-scenes looks at the music, etc. The lack of all that was an unfortunately lost opportunity.

But after all that, the positives still outweigh the negatives, and if another season of "Symphony of the Goddesses" came along with a different selection of music to perform, I'd still go see it.

I would, too. Hopefully the success of this show will encourage other touring symphonic suites to stop by here as well -- Final Fantasy concert, anyone? Or perhaps "Video Games Live"? One can dream.

It really is an experience, especially if the concert is always being tweaked and improved. I appreciate any event that elevates and enhances what is often seen as a "juvenile" activity, and lots of kudos go out to everyone from the producers to the orchestra to the fans for making this happen. Here's hoping this won't be the last such concert that we see here.

"Borderlands" tales: The Claptrap chronicles

January 30th, 2015
By



In my previous post, I rambled on extensively mostly about Legend of Zelda-related video games. That actually hadn't been my intent. I was supposed to ramble about Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel, but I got distracted because I went on some kind of extended monologue about stuff leading up to Borderlands.

Before I leave off on talking about Legend of Zelda-related stuff, however, just a quick note that we will indeed be there at tonight's Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses concert at the Blaisdell Concert Hall! Tickets are still available at the link above. It's the first big video-game-music concert in Hawaii, so attend if you can! We're expecting it to be awesome. ^_^

Anyway, let me get back on my intended track. This will actually be a great time to take up the subject again since Gearbox and 2K recently announced the March release of Borderlands: The Handsome Collection, which comprises Borderlands 2 and the Pre-Sequel, as well as the related downloadable content (DLC) for both games, remade for next-generation systems (Xbox One and Playstation 4). I've also heard tell that the original Borderlands might eventually be included if the collection does well.

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Otaku melodies flow into 2015

December 25th, 2014
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This hasn't exactly been the most productive of months here at Otaku Ohana Central. You probably could have figured that out from the fact that this is the first post I've made here this month ... and the month, not to mention all of 2014, is almost over. Apologies for the long delay between posts.

There are more posts in the works -- my look back on the year that was in the otaku community will be coming up shortly, followed by my long overdue profile of/interview with josei manga artist Erica Sakurazawa, and then my even longer overdue chat with voice actor Kyle Hebert will be coming after that. But first, we have some housekeeping to tend to here, so let's dig in (and get my writing chops back up to speed!) with a pair of recent music-themed news tidbits.

Eir AoiThe freshest news comes from the Kawaii Kon camp, with the Christmas Day announcement that singer Eir Aoi -- that's her at right -- will be the headlining musical guest at the anime convention in 2015. The 26-year-old is the voice behind a number of popular anime theme songs, including Fate/Zero, Kill la Kill, Mobile Suit Gundam AGE and Sword Art Online and its sequel. All of her music -- including her two albums to date, Blau and Aube -- are available digitally via  iTunes or Amazon's digital music department. This will be Aoi's first appearance in Hawaii.

Aoi joins cosplayer Leah Rose and voice actors Rob Paulsen (Yakko Warner, Animaniacs), Jess Harnell (Wakko Warner, Animaniacs), Bryce Papenbrook (Eren, Attack on Titan), Todd Haberkorn (Haruka, Free! Eternal Summer) and -- announced during my unanticipated hiatus from this blog -- Cassandra Morris (Kyubey, Madoka Magica) as guests for next year's show, scheduled for March 27-29 at the Hawai'i Convention Center. Visit www.kawaii-kon.org for more information or to register.

20141225_201259_3_bestshotMeanwhile, those of you who are more into symphonic music and video games -- specifically, of the Legend of Zelda variety -- will be pleased to know that Nintendo's officially licensed concert tour, The Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses, will be stopping by at 8 p.m. Jan. 30 at the Blaisdell Concert Hall. From the official concert website (zelda-symphony.com):

Designed to be a journey as epic and thrilling as the Legend itself, The Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses presents the music of this celebrated franchise with all-new arrangements directly approved by franchise producer Eiji Aonuma and Nintendo composer and sound director Koji Kondo (Super Mario Bros., The Legend of Zelda).

Featuring a first in video game concert history, The Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses has been arranged and programmed with classical sensibilities in mind, organizing the music of this beloved franchise into a complete, 4 movement symphony, worthy of the Hero of Hyrule himself.

Insert "treasure GET!" music here.

You can expect selections from Majora's Mask, Link Between Worlds, Ocarina of Time, Wind Waker and Twilight Princess, along with chicken skin and/or loud cheering when the opening strains of the "Legend of Zelda Overture" begin to play. I understand there's going to be a rather large contingent of cosplayers coming to see the show, so bring your cameras (but please stow them away during the performance itself).

Want tickets. Sure, you do. Because there are plenty. (The dark spots show available seats as of Christmas Day.)

zelda ticket map

Everything from the back-of-the-house seats ($48.05 including fees) to the hard-core fan VIP seats ($138.55, includes a limited-edition poster and a meet-and-greet with the producers following the show) remain available. Just click on that ticket map above to order via Ticketmaster (and get an up-to-date view of tickets sold, to boot).

Baby, the anime/manga/toon stars shine bright

November 19th, 2014
By



Welcome back to Otaku Ohana, the blog that I've had far too little time to update for one reason or another as of late. I thank you for your continued patience and readership.

One of the combined benefits/drawbacks of not having time to post for so long is that the news tends to stack up. A lot. That's the way it's been with guest announcements at various shows and events around town; one minute, you're hearing that two of the voice actors from your favoritest show in the world ever as you were growing up are coming to town, then the up-and-coming sci-fi convention on another island brings in a few anime-related fan favorites of their own, then a bona fide manga artist shows up, and pretty soon you're sitting down and writing a blog post that runs for more than 1,600 words. Heck, one of these announcements (*cough*Melissa Fahn*cough*) is so new, it hasn't even been formally announced in public yet, but it has been confirmed and vetted for release to me by HawaiiCon, so I'm rolling with it.

You're going to need a scorecard to keep track of everyone who's coming in, so here's a roundup of all the guest announcements that have been made to date. Taku Taku Matsuri, Kawaii Kon, HawaiiCon, even a Honolulu Museum of Art exhibit ... they're all here.

Jamie Lynn Lano

Princess of Tennis coverBest known for: She's one of the rare artists from the United States who's managed to make a go of things in the manga industry in Japan, serving as an assistant to Prince of Tennis artist Takeshi Konomi for about a year as he worked on launching The New Prince of Tennis and chronicling her experience, first on her blog at jamieism.com and then in her memoir released this year, The Princess of Tennis. She's since moved to Oahu and has become a mainstay with the Nightmarchers, Honolulu's Quidditch team (profiled in this story, available to Star-Advertiser subscribers). At Taku Taku Matsuri, she'll be hosting a panel from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. as well as taking part in a demonstration with the Nightmarchers from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.

Appearing at: Taku Taku Matsuri, Saturday at the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii (2211 S. Beretania St.) Presale tickets ($13) and ticket/T-shirt packs ($20) are available at www.gofundme.com/dbi0fc. Prices will be higher at the door, so save yourself a few bucks and order now.

Cristina Vee

cristina veeBest known for: Mio in K-ON!, Homura in Puella Magi Madoka Magica, Rei/Sailor Mars in Viz's new Sailor Moon English dub, and Alisa Bosconovitch in Tekken: Blood Vengeance -- she's voiced them all in a career that's been going strong since she voiced Nanoha in Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha in 2008. She's also voiced various characters in video games including the BlazBlue franchise, Skullgirls and Ar Tonelico.

Appearing at: Taku Taku Matsuri, Saturday. Her panel will run from 3:30 to 5 p.m. with an autograph session to follow from 5 to 6:30 p.m. There are also seven slots still available for a special lunch with her at noon Sunday; those packages, which also include a Taku Taku ticket and T-shirt, are going for $100. Get them at the GoFundMe link above.

Erica Sakurazawa

Aromatic BittersBest known for: Remember back in the early-to-mid-2000s, when Tokyopop was at the height of its "throw all the manga and sorta-manga at the wall and let's see what sticks" power? Among those that got largely lost in that shuffle were six standalone volumes by Erica Sakurazawa published under their "Manga After Hours" banner: Between the Sheets, Angel, Angel Nest, Nothing But Loving You, The Rules of Love and The Aromatic Bitters. As the line's banner would indicate, these weren't your average mass-market titles aimed at teens; instead, they were josei manga, mature stories with a target audience of women in their 20s and older. Johanna Draper Carlson has a profile of those books over at Manga Worth Reading.

Sakurazawa is appearing in connection with the Honolulu Museum of Art's new exhibit opening Thursday, "Modern Love: 20th-Century Japanese Erotic Art," which will feature a section on manga with one of her works, Love Vibes, translated into English. Art from Moyoco Anno (In Clothes Called Fat, Happy Mania, Sugar Sugar Rune) and Suehiro Maruo (Mr. Arashi's Amazing Freak Show, The Strange Tale of Panorama Island) also will be featured. As the exhibit title indicates, there's going to be a lot of imagery containing mature themes in this exhibit, so you'll want to leave the kids at home for this one.

Appearing at: Honolulu Museum of Art Doris Duke Theater, Wed., Dec. 3, 4 p.m. Admission is free. She's also hosting a workshop at the Honolulu Museum of Art School on Dec. 7 where she'll be demonstrating her step-by-step process for drawing manga, but unless you already have an invitation to that, you can't go. Sorry about that.

Todd Haberkorn

Best known for: The newest addition to this guest roundup (announced by Kawaii Kon Sunday night!), Haberkorn's no stranger to our little rock in the middle of the Pacific, having been a guest at Kawaii Kon in 2013. He was recently added to the English dub cast of fangirl fanservice magnet Free! Eternal Summer, playing the role of Haruka Nanase. Other prominent roles include Natsu in Fairy Tail, Death the Kid in Soul Eater, Allen Walker in D.Gray Man, Italy in Hetalia Axis Powers, Keisuke Takahashi in Initial D, Keroro in Sgt. Frog and Kimihiro Watanuki in xxxHolic.

Appearing at: Kawaii Kon, March 27-29. Three-day passes are available online for $53 ($44 children ages 5-12) at www.showclix.com/event/3817763/listing. There are still a few Artist Alley tables available for sale at that link. And if you have some extra piles of cash around the house, please give me some there's still a VIP Package for one person ($750), a VIP Package for two people ($900) and a lifetime membership pass ($3,000) available.

Jess Harnell

Animaniacs v4Best known for: He's played a number of roles over the years -- he was the voice of Abraham Lincoln, George Washington, Bill Clinton and Isaac Newton in the recent CGI revival of Mr. Peabody & Sherman! -- but the one role pretty much anyone who grew up in the '90s remembers him for is Wakko Warner, the baseball-cap-wearing, giant mallet-bearing Warner sibling in Animaniacs with a Ringo Starr-esque voice.

Appearing at: Kawaii Kon, March 27-29.

Rob Paulsen

Best known for: At Kawaii Kon this year, Jim Cummings filled the role of "the guy who voiced half the characters of your childhood" quite nicely. Next year? Paulsen's bringing the other half. Consider his resume: Yakko Warner, Dr. Otto von Scratchensniff and Pinky in Animaniacs. Raphael in the classic Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles cartoon. Donatello in Nickelodeon's CGI Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles revival. Carl in The Adventures of Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius. Arthur in The Tick. Throttle in Biker Mice From Mars. P.J. Pete in Goof Troop. Bubsy the Bobcat in those series of Mario/Sonic-esque 2-D platformer games that we'd much rather forget from the Super Nintendo era. The list goes on and on and on.

Appearing at: Kawaii Kon, March 27-29.

Bryce Papenbrook

Best known for: As the first person announced as a guest for Kawaii Kon 2015 -- the news came down at this year's closing ceremonies back in April -- Papenbrook is the person we've known is coming to Hawaii for the longest time. He's the voice of Eren in Attack on Titan, Rin Okumura in Blue Exorcist, Kirito in Sword Art Online and Hanabusa Aidou in Vampire Knight, which I understand are four series chock full of the new hawtness that all the young 'uns have been flocking to in droves in recent years.

Appearing at: Kawaii Kon, March 27-29.

Steve Blum

bebopBest known for: Being the voices of two space voyagers -- Spike Spiegel in Cowboy Bebop, Tom the android in countless Cartoon Network Toonami block bumpers -- as well as the red-cloaked man with his trusty handgun Cerberus, Vincent Valentine, in Final Fantasy VII offshoots Dirge of Cerberus and Advent Children, and the sinister Orochimaru in the Naruto franchise. Blum's previous convention appearance in the islands was at Kawaii Kon in 2007.

Appearing at: HawaiiCon, Sept. 10-13 at the Hapuna Beach Prince Hotel on Hawaii island. Discounted four-day passes ($125), VIP passes ($399) and "Five-Year Mission" passes for the next five years of the convention ($500) are available through Dec. 31 at www.eventbrite.com/e/hawaiicon-2015-pre-sale-passes-tickets-13085636491. (Also, if you're a fan of Farscape, Firefly, Dr. Who or Stargate, you might want to have a look at this Kickstarter campaign that went live Tuesday night. Just sayin'.)

Melissa Fahn

Best known for: Complementing Blum in Cowboy Bebop as the voice of -- take a deep breath here -- Edward Wong Hau Pepelu Tivrusky IV, ace computer hacker aboard the Bebop. She's also continuing the trend of Invader Zim voice actors who have visited our fair isles, being the voice of Gaz in that series. Other roles include Eri Ninamori in FLCL ... and the Tachikoma in Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex, which links her to someone else who'll be visiting Hawaii next year...

Appearing at: HawaiiCon, Sept. 10-13.

Mary Elizabeth McGlynn

GitS SACBest known for: Ten years ago this past September, the long-awaited sequel to the Ghost in the Shell movie, Ghost in the Shell 2: Innocence, made its U.S. debut. A quick search on Rotten Tomatoes shows that it wasn't nearly as well-regarded as the first one. Looking back now, it was notable for one reason: It marked Mary Elizabeth McGlynn's debut as the voice of Motoko Kusanagi, a role she held throughout the franchise's Stand-Alone Complex phase.  She's also voiced a number of anime roles under the alias of Melissa Williamson, including Julia in Cowboy Bebop, Urd in Ah! My Goddess: The Movie, Nuriko in Fushigi Yugi and Hilda in Outlaw Star.

And voice acting isn't her sole talent in the industry; she's served as ADR director for everything Naruto-related in the United States as well as Cowboy Bebop, and she's sung a number of tracks on the soundtracks for Silent Hill 3, 4 and Origins. (Also, "Your Rain (Rage Mix)" and "You're Not Here" in your Dance Dance Revolution playlists? That's her singing.)

Appearing at: HawaiiCon, Sept. 10-13.

May the Triforce be with us

October 29th, 2014
By



Blogs are wonderful things. Most of the ones associated with the Star-Advertiser, including this one, are informational. Which is great, but it would be a shame, really, to limit it to that. Because here, we can talk about whatever (almost). We can be informal. We don't need to adhere to strict grammar rules or AP style. And it certainly has been some time since we here at Otaku Ohana have just, well, shot the breeze.

So that's what this post is about.

Well, not completely. It's more like me going on very long ramblings about video games, because this is probably the best place for me to ramble about them. So if that's not what you're here for, and you just want to pass on by, then I'll understand.

Feel like entering the possibly rough currents of my stream-of-consciousness typing? Then read on, intrepid adventurers...

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